Asia World Scene

Asia- list of articles in the section Asia World Scene

  • Mainstream Asia: Ravi Shankar
        To mark the 60th birthday of India’s most famous composer and musician Ravi Shankar, Radio Netherlands devoted a special edition of its weekly Asia magazine programme Mainstream …
  • Dr. Christiaan Barnard – The Body Machine
    Gerard Rakers talks to South African heart transplant pioneeer Dr. Christaan Barnard about his book: “The Body Machine”. Taken from Mainstream Asia in 1982. Share this:Click to share on …
  • Pete Myers: The making of the film “Gandhi”
    David Attenborough’s epic film biography of Mahatma Gandhi (1869-1948) presents a sweeping, masterful image of the life of India’s great pioneer of independence and 20th-century …
  • Salman Rushdie’s Novel “Shame”
    In this programme the renowned and controversial writer Salman Rushdie discusses his third novel “Shame”, published in 1983. The story is set in postcolonial Pakistan and explores the …
  • Pete Myers meets Anita Desai
    In this Mainstream Asia Special, Pete Myers meets Indian writer Anita Desai to discuss her life, her preferred writing language – English – although she speaks fluent Hindi and German, …
  • Family planning in India
      To coincide with the second World Population Conference in Mexico City City, Pete Myers presents in-depth interviews with two experts on India’s family planning programme. It was a …
  • Pete Myers interviews J.G. Ballard about his novel “Empire of the Sun”
    Pete Myers discusses the acclaimed autobiographical novel “Empire of the Sun”, whose main character is based on the author’s own boyhood memories . Born in Shanghai, Ballard …
  • Pete Myers interviews David Lean
    “A passage to India” Share this:Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)…
  • Mainstream Asia – The Royal visit by Queen Beatrix and Prince Claus to India
    In 1986, Queen Beatrix and her husband Prince Claus paid a royal visit to India. Mainstream Asia and Pete Myers accompanied them.  Share this:Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click …
  • Pete Myers interviews Mother Theresa – Children of God
    Mother Theresa Statue ( WikiCommons) Share this:Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)…
  • Interview with the Dalai Lama in November 1989
    This is an unedited 40-minute interview with His Holiness the Dalai Lama, spiritual leader of Tibetan Buddhists and one of the world’s most revered advocates of non-violence and altruism. The …
  • Silk kimonos
    This special edition of Asiascan focuses on silk, from its discovery, to the production process, to the final product. Maya Scheepers and Mieke Kooistra go on a silk thread route through Thailand. …
  • Road sign in Spiti Valley, Himachel Pradesh, India
    The next battleground: AIDS in India
    Every day across the globe, 5.000 people are infected by the virus that causes AIDS. More than 14 million people are believed to have been infected so far, mostly in Africa. A new battlefield is now …
  • Mirror Images: Indian women writers
    By the mid-1990’s when this programme was made, a number of Indian writers like Vikram Seth and Salman Rushdie had made a huge impact on the international literary scene. In this programme, we …
  • Child labour in Bangalore, India
    Children without dreams – the first in a 2-part series on child labour in the Indian subcontinent
    No one knows how many children around the globe are forced to work, but a large percentage of the world’s child labor force is located in the Indian subcontinent. In India alone, the government …
  • Shoeshine boy
    The ins and outs – the second in a 2-part series on child labour in the Indian subcontinent
    Working children are everywhere to be found in India’s major cities. They work mostly on the streets, peddling one thing or another, shining shoes or doing some other menial tasks. In rural …
  • They Call Her Madam
    In this award-winning edition of “East of Edam”, Dheera Sujan and Maggie Ayre pay tribute to some of the powerful and influential women who are changing India, and are doing so in spite …
  • Safia Bhatti, a teaching assistant in Pakistan
    Just ’cause you’re a woman – a look at women in Pakistan
    It’s hard to imagine a country where women have a more difficult life than in Pakistan. Literacy rates among women are abysmally poor. Female infanticide is widely practiced, and women generally get …
  • Microchips Yes, Potato Chips No
    India relaxed its laws on foreign investments in 1991 and opened its doors to market liberalization. By the time this programme was made a few years later, India was being referred to as the …
  • Standing on their own legs – the fight against poverty in India
    In the mid-1980s, a non-governmental organisation near the southern Indian city of Bangalore began an experiment to help people in nearly 150 villages to create a better life for themselves. Praxis, …
  • Huis ten Bosch
    Huis ten Bosch (in Japan)
    During the period from 1641 to 1859, Nagasaki was the only Japanese city allowed to trade with the outside world. The city developed close ties with Dutch traders. To commemorate this long-standing …
  • Child literacy in India
    The strength to move on – literacy in India
    India is fighting a losing battle to achieve literacy for all. The country’s population is growing so quickly that the educational system simply cannot keep up. Every year, India needs 175,000 …
  • Research File Special: Save Bombay: the environmental impact of urbanization
    In this Research File special, Eric Beauchemin visits Bombay (population at the 10-15 million). The city stands for the many huge urban areas emerging through the developing world and which are …
  • Kashmiri man and his shikara
    Kashmir, the sad valley
    As the British raj left the Indian subcontinent in 1947, the rulers of the princely states were given the right to join India or Pakistan. One maharaja wanting full independence for his state wavered …
  • Turning a new page: Japanese youth in transition
    For decades, the Japanese young person’s recipe for success later in life has gone something like this: study hard, pass exams, get into the best university, jet a job for life and then work 12 …
  • Anne no Nikki
    Mirror Images – Japan special
    The weekly survey of arts and culture, “Mirror Images”, spotlights Japan, with animated film version of the Diary of Anne Frank, the popular all girl rock group Shonen Knife and the gay …
  • Survivors of the A-bombs in Hiroshima and Nagasaki
    50th anniversary of the A-bomb attacks – the ongoing research into the effects of radiation
    In 1945, the United States dropped atomic bombs on Hiroshima, killing 75,000 people instantly. Tens of thousands more died in the following years as a result of the effects of radiation. A few days …
  • The Girdle of Emeralds: Dutch colonial rule in the East Indies
    In August 1945, Indonesians proclaimed independence from the Netherlands. After hundreds of years of Dutch colonial rule. The East Indies was one of the world’s largest, richest and most …
  • Hiroshima mushroom cloud nuclear bomb explosion
    The survivors of the atomic bomb attacks in Japan
    On August 6, 1945, an atomic bomb was dropped on Hiroshima Japan. 75,000 people died instantly. 75,000 more were injured. Thousands were killed in the fires that ravaged Hiroshima in the following …
  • The Colonial Muse: The East Indies as an Inspiration for the Dutch Novel
    The most famous Dutch novel of the 19th century is “Max Havelaar” by Multatuli (pen name of Eduard Douwes-Dekker (1820-1887). It not only became a classic of European literature but also …
  • Women living under Muslim law
    This organisation or network was set up in 1986 by Muslim feminists to take action against (Islamic) legislation which discriminates against women. Hélène Michaud talks to women from Pakistan, …
  • Robert van Gulik
    The Dutch mandarin: Robert van Gulik
    In his time, Judge Dee, a historical figure of the Tang Dynasty, earned fame as a magistrate, detective and statesman. Though never forgotten in his own country, it was only in the 20th century that …
  • The King’s brew: Darjeeling tea
    In the beautiful north-eastern hills of India lies Darjeeling. And it is there that the true aristocrat of teas is grown. It is there that tea lover and world traveller Dheera Sujan indulged herself …
  • The double-faced mask: homosexuality in Japan
    Homosexuality was quite common among the samurai – the military class in feudal Japan – and there are many literary works dating back several centuries which deal with love between men. …
  • Chinese language
    It’s a truism to say that language is fundamental to culture. In Hong Kong, political change is laying a path for cultural change, and language is an important aspect of that shift. When the …
  • Siren Song: Nien Chen, victim of the Chinese Cultural Revolution
    Before the Cultural Revolution, which started in the mid-1960’s, Nien Chen held a high position at Shell in Shanghai, was privileged, had servants, etc. But almost overnight, she was labeled a …
  • Siren Song: Shai Shahar, gigolo
    Dheera Sujan meets this former sex worker, but also soldier, journalist and jazz singer. He had just published a booked called “Bedggeheimen van een Gigolo or the Bedroom secrets of a …
  • Siren Song: Rohinton Mistry & Udayan Prasad
    In this edition of the programme, Dheera Sujan has two guests, both Westernized Indians who talk about the way their culture influences their art. Rohinton Mistry is a writer who has lived in Canada …
  • Hong Kong
    Revolution at Midnight: Hong Kong, China
    Marijke van der Meer examines the future of Hong Kong, on the eve of its return into the Chinese fold on July 1, 1997. She meets the locals: a legislator, a businessman, an asylum seeker, a …
  • Partition: India and Pakistan separate in 1947
    This programme was broadcast to mark the 50th anniversary of the Partition of the Subcontinent when India and Pakistan gained independence from British colonial rule in 1947. Floris van Straaten …
  • The Other Side of Midnight: Pakistan 50 Years after Partition
    When British India was granted independence in 1947, the Subcontinent was divided into two countries, a predominantly Hindu India and to its East and West a predominantly Muslim Pakistan. The …
  • Siren Song – The Indian cinema
    Dheera Sujan focusses on the phenomenal success and popularity of Indian films. Guest speakers include critic Derek Malcolm, the director of the Indian International Film Festival, Malti Sahai, …
  • Siren Song: Bhutanese newspaper editor Kinley Dorji
    Dheera Sujan visits Bhutan, an ancient, pristine land with none of the problems (overpopulation, environmental degradation, crime, etc.) that beset most of the world. But for how long will it be so …
  • Siren Song – Bhutan’s traditional music
    Dheera Sujan visits Bhutan’s National Institute of Traditional Medicine. She finds out how to use tiger bones to cure epilepsy and how turning a prayer wheel could affect your health. Share …
  • Toilets in India
    Bombay is India’s most cosmopolitan city. Its sheer scope, hustle and bustle, its mass of human can overwhelm. On a taxi ride to the city, chances are, you will be greeted by the sight of a row …
  • Casting off: the Vietnamese boat people
    In a special report, Marijke van der Meer explores one of the sad legacies of the war in Vietnam. Over 20 years after the fall of Saigon, thousands of the nearly one million Vietnamese boat people …
  • Where the tiger roamed
    In the 19th century, 100,000 tigers stalked the Asian forests. But big game hunting, illegal poaching and the destruction of their habitat has shrunk that number to less than 6,0000, the majority of …
  • Siren Song – Indian elephants
    Dheera Sujan meets two Indian conservationists who are worried about the plight of the Asian elephant. There are around 25,000 of them in India, but ivory poachers and a shrinking habitat are a real …
  • Mahatma Gandhi: Commemorating the 50th Anniversary of His Death
    It is difficult to adequately assess the political and spiritual importance of the life of Mahatma Gandhi (1869-1948). He was assassinated in Delhi on January 30, 1998 but his legacy as an ethical …
  • Siren Song: Lulu Wang
    Siren Song meets Lulu Wang, the Chinese author of the Lilly Theatre (and later of other books), a fictionalised account of her experiences in China’s cultural revolution. It was an …
  • The Spice Lords: the History of the VOC, Part 1 of 4 – The Company of Far Lands
    The VOC (Verenigde Oostindische Compagnie) or Dutch East India Company was the world’s first multinational commercial empire. For nearly two hundred years, from the time it was established in …
  • The Spice Lords: the History of the VOC, Part 2 of 4 – “Iron Fist, Velvet Glove”
    The VOC (Verenigde Oostindische Compagnie) or Dutch East India Company was the world’s first multinational commercial empire. For nearly two hundred years, from the time it was established in …
  • The Spice Lords: the History of the VOC, Part 4 of 4
    The VOC (Verenigde Oostindische Compagnie) or Dutch East India Company was the world’s first multinational commercial empire. For nearly two hundred years, from the time it was established in …
  • Back home in Malanday
    Every day, 2000 Filipinos leave their country to take up jobs abroad. The Philippines is the world’s biggest exporter of labour. In this documentary, Hélène Michaud takes us to Malanday, a …
  • Old heroes, new heroes: Identity in the Philippines
    On June 12, the Philippines celebrated the 100th anniversary of its declaration of independence from Spain. The irony is that it was, in fact, handed over to the United States for 20 million dollars. …
  • Stories of Our Century: “Wild Swans”
    This entry is part of the series Stories of Our CenturyIn 1999, Radio Netherlands broadcast a series of 12 programmes telling the story of the 20th century through famous books. In each programme a …
  • A curse and a blessing: Water in the Bengali psyche
    Bangladesh lies on a delta created by three of the world’s greatest rivers. To them, it is life in the form of food and transport. It is also death as the annual floods drown this most densely …
  • Dr. Kiran Bedi, India's first female police officer
    East of Edam: They call her madam
    In this award-winning programme (finalist at the New York Radio Festivals in 1994), Dheera Sujan and Maggie Ayre pay tribute to some of the powerful and influential women in all walks of life who …
  • Taming the River Dragon – The Three Gorges Dam, Part 2
    In this two-part series, Jane Murphy visits China to look at the impact of the biggest hydro-electric project in the world: the Three Gorges Dam, being built on the Yangtze River.     Share …
  • The Black Death: the Bubonic Plague and its vast consequences
    The Black Death, or Great Plague, was one of the most devastating waves of disease and death in human history. Modern historians of the Middle Ages estimate that up to 200 million people succumbed to …
  • Taming the River Dragon, Part 1
      In this two part series, Jane Murphy looks at the impact of the biggest hydro-electric project on earth: the massive Three Gorges Dam being constructed on China’s longest river, the …
  • Children of midnight
    Dheera Sujan looks at 50 years of Indian independence and partition through the experiences of one family. For although the people of India had won the right to rule themselves, the partition of …
  • Celestial China: the Search for Uncle Ned
    In this program, producer Martha Hawley goes in search of her great uncle, Edwin Hawley, known in her family as Uncle Ned. Born in 1881, he left for China as a young man, a staunch Presbyterian …
  • Everest: The coveted mountain
    Crampons and spikes feature heavily in this heady documentary from James McDonald looking at the history of the challenge to climb the world’s highest mountain.  Share this:Click to share …
  • Malaysian malaise
    Hélène Michaud takes us to Malaysia. This country in south-east Asia has been in political turmoil since the sacking last year of Deputy Prime Minister Anwar Ibrahim, who is now being tried on …
  • The Bosphorus
    The Bosphorous is the only link to the outside world for the nations of the Black Sea. It runs through the heart of Istanbul with shipping (oil, chemicals, etc.) posing a potential threat to the …
  • Ahmed Rashid
    The Taliban – Ahmed Rashid and his passion for Afghanistan
    By the turn of the century, Afghanistan had been at war for nearly two decades. The Afghans first took up arms to oust the Soviet occupiers and then the conflict descended into civil war. Pakistani …
  • Aural Tapestry: Music along the Silk Road
    This is the first of two programme about the Silk Road Projects, initiated by acclaimed cellist Yo Yo Ma, which brings together music and musicians from around the world. In fact, the project follows …
  • Siren Song: Arundhati Roy
    Dheera Sujan talks to Indian writer Arundhati Roy, whose first novel “A God of Small Things” became a world-wide bestseller. She studied architecture, flirted with acting, lived in a …
  • Teetering on the brink – Tajikistan
    Eric Beauchemin visits the former Soviet Republic of Tajikistan in Central Asia. It has been independent since 1991, but a civil war devastated most of the new country’s infrastructure. On top …
  • Research File: Von Siebold’s treasures
    To mark the 400th anniversary of Japanese-Dutch relations, Liesbeth de Bakker focuses on scientist Philipp Franz von Siebold who left behind beautiful collections of thousands of Japanese plants, …
  • Research File: Ai, the chimp who counts
    Liesbeth de Bakker visits the Primate Research Institute at Kyoto University in Japan, and she meets Chimpanzee Ai, the chimp who counts and her research partner. Find out what Liesbeth has learned …
  • Of sake and Dutch gin
    De Liefde replica in Huis ten Bosch, Japan  On April 19, 1600, the Dutch merchant ship “de Liefde” arrived in Japan and the sailors set up a trading post. When half a century later, …
  • Shakila, aged 5, was born with a short leg
    Disability in Afghanistan
    Afghanistan is one of the countries with the world’s highest percentages of disabled people. It’s estimated that over 800,000 people have some kind of disability, that’s over 1 in 20 Afghans. Many …
  • Afghan family on the move
    The right to life in Afghanistan
    For people in the developed world, human rights mean things like a free press, the right to vote or freedom from torture. But in many parts of the developing world, people are concerned with more …
  • Bollywood for Westerners
    Jonathan Groubert visits Bombay, the movie capital of the world, where more than 1000 flicks are produced each year. The international appeal of these Hindi films is growing. What is their appeal, …
  • Getting clean – Drug addiction in Pakistan
    In Pakistan, there are over three million heroin addicts, and this figutre is still rising. Eric Beauchemin meets some of them, sees how and where they live and talks to local groups who are fighting …
  • Break the silence: end child sexual abuse
    Child sexual abuse in Pakistan
    In Pakisan, child sexual abuse is rampant, but it remains shrouded in secrecy. Both girls and boys are the victims of abuse, and few of the perpetrators are ever convicted. Guilt and shame are …
  • Women wearing burqas
    My only wish – the story of four Afghan women
    Much has been said and written about the situation of women today in Afghanistan. Since the ruling Taliban movement took over power in 1996, women have been subjected to what many in the West regard …
  • Tokyo
    Dutch Horizons: Dutch jazz in Japan
    Dutch jazz in Tokyo In the autumn of 2001, RN organised a Dutch music week in Japan. The crème de la crème of Dutch jazz musicians gave several concerts in Tokyo and Nagasaki. Jonathan Marks and Hans …
  • Sound Fountain: The real Kamasutra
    The Kamasutra has been used and misused over the centuries. Its name has become synonymous with exotic sex. But in fact, it is a treatise on pleasure. It’s latest translator from Sanskrit, …
  • When Strangers Meet: the Silk Road Project
    “When Strangers Meet” is the title of a CD produced under the direction of world famous cellist Yo-yo Ma for The Silk Road Project. It brings together musicians from East and West in an …
  • Heavenly stories, Bollywood dreams
    There are two things that every Indian knows intimately and loves deeply: the stories of the two great Indian epics – the Ramayana and the Mahabharata – and the celluloid dreams of …
  • The Real Kamasutra
    The world’s most famous text on erotic love, The Kamasutra, is a collection of Sanskrit writings put together in India in the 3rd century. The text has been used and abused, misinterpreted and …
  • Sound Fountain/Global Perspective: The McDonaldisation of Hong Kong
    Global Perspective: a group of international broadcasters exchange documentaries with a common theme. This five-part series examines the way in which global forces are challenging business and …
  • The Opening of the Chrysanthemum: Japan’s tamed rivers
    In the 2nd half of the 19th century, the Meiji Restoration in Japan was moving the country from a medieval agricultural economy to an industrialized one. It was a time of tremendous change and …
  • Johannis de Rijke: the Dutch Sensai
    Johannis de Rijke (1842-1913) was the son of a humble dyke worker from Zeeland. Yet by the time he died, he had reached the highest position ever reached by a foreigner in Japan and was a regular …
  • Heavenly Stories: Bollywood dreams
    India literature produced the single longest poem in history, the great epic Mahabarata. Today the ancient story-telling and poetry recital traditions of India live on in “Bollywood”, the …
  • Dutch Horizons: Relations between Sri Lanka and the Netherlands
    To mark the 400th anniversary of the Dutch East India Company, plus the fact that exactly 400 years ago the first Dutchman set foot in Sri Lanka, Liesbeth de Bakker sailed forth to find out how Sri …
  • A Maritime Pompeii – VOC Ship De Avondster
    Liesbeth de Bakker visits Galle in Sri Lanka where in the bay a wrecked VOC ship, De Avondster, is being recovered to put on display in a special museum. Experts from the Netherlands, Sri Lanka and …
  • The VOC Archives: the Records of the Dutch East India Company
    Over 400 years ago, in 1602, the Dutch East India Company was set up with trading posts all over the world, and it grew into the first and biggest multinational commercial enterprise of its time. The …
  • A Good Life: AIDS in Thailand
    Neville Powis visits the region near Chiang Mai, in the northeast of Thailand, near the border with Burma and Vietnam. AIDS began to spread 15 years ago and now an estimated one million people are …
  • Rivers of the World: India’s Saraswati
    This entry is part of the series Rivers of the WorldRivers cradle the world’s earliest civilizations. Mythology and religion were born on their banks. They provide us with life-giving water. We eat …
  • Rivers of the World: the Mun River in Thailand
    This entry is part of the series Rivers of the WorldRivers cradle the world’s earliest civilizations. Mythology and religion were born on their banks. They provide us with life-giving water. We eat …
  • Tagore: the Wisdom Master
    In 1913, the Nobel Prize for literature was awarded to Indian poet Rabindranath Tagore (1861-1941). It was the first time the prize was given to an Asian writer. But Tagore was more than a poet. He …
  • Traces of War: Survivors of the Burma and Pakanbaroe Railroad
    “Traces of War” is a book created by photographer Jan Banning about 24 men who survived slave labour on the construction of the notorious Burmese and Pakanbaroe railroads. The railway …
  • Pascal Khoo Thwe: The Land of Green Ghosts
    Destiny brought together two men from different worlds – one a Padaung tribal from the hill tracts of Burma, the other an ivory tower Cambridge don. The meeting would change both their lives forever. …
  • SENSE India for the deafblind
    The World at your Fingertips: Helen Keller’s legacy touches deafblind children in India
    Helen Keller said that blindness separates a person from objects and deafness separates that person from people. Without support, encouragement and education the world of a deafblind person can be an …
  • Holland’s Black Page: the Violence of Decolonisation
    This is part of a series called “War and Forgiveness” about the victims and perpetrators of wartime atrocities, produced by Radio Netherlands together with WNYC and Sound Print. In this …
  • Adrift in Sri Lanka: the Tsunami
    Marijke van der Meer was travelling in the hill country of Sri Lanka in December 2004,when the news came of the tsunami. She joined a Dutch nurse and an American doctor preparing and escorting …
  • A Hiroshima Story
    On a sunny August morning in 1945, Keijiro Matsushima sat in his math class in Hiroshima. He looked out the window, saw two American bombers in the clear blue sky, and suddenly his world was torn …
  • Keeping the Peace: Dutch Peacekeepers in Afghanistan
    In 2002, the Netherlands sent a peace-keeping contingent to Afghanistan as part of ISAF, the International Security and Assistance Force. In this program we speak with some of the officers and …
  • Indian Courtesans and the Baiji Tradition
    From the 16th century onwards, the guardians of the great vocal music of northern India were the “courtesans”, the Tawaif Baiji, high-class women schooled in dancing, song and poetry who …
  • ECPAT office
    Used and abused: child trafficking in southeast Asia
    Throughout southeast Asia, tens of thousands of children are being trafficked. Most go to neighbouring countries, but they can be sent as far away as South Korea or Australia. Because human …
  • Billy Barnaart
    Under Foreign Skies – Billy Barnaart
    This entry is part of the series Under Foreign SkiesDutchman Billy Barnaart is a physiotherapist, who specialises in working with the mentally disabled. After working for ten years in a centre in The …
  • Lea Laarakker-Dingjan
    Under Foreign Skies – Lea Laarakker-Dingjan
    This entry is part of the series Under Foreign SkiesOver 20 years ago, Lea Laarakker-Dingjan and her husband moved to Thailand. Shortly afterwards, Lea took in two foster children who came from an …
  • Mercy Centre T-shirt
    Thailand’s Mercy Centre and the fight against HIV/AIDS
    A quarter of a century after HIV/AIDS first emerged, the disease continues to wreak havoc in many parts of the world. Initially, one of the hardest hit countries was Thailand. In the mid- and late …
  • Father John Visser
    Under Foreign Skies – Father John Visser
    When Father John Visser met Silesian priests at the end of World War II, he knew that he too wanted to become a Silesian of Don Bosco, an organisation dedicated to helping young people. “I didn’t …
  • Annelie Hendriks
    Under Foreign Skies – Annelie Hendriks
    This entry is part of the series Under Foreign SkiesAnnelie Hendriks has always been a globe-trotter. At the age of 17, she travelled to the Middle East and then on to the former Soviet Union and the …
  • A Life of Ashes: Widows in India
    The ancient Indian practice of “sati” or “suttee”, widow-burning, was banned under British colonial rule in 1829, but in modern-day India the plight of a woman who loses her …
  • The Music of Lutes and Harps: the Changing Tune of Chinese Family Life
    In this award-winning programme we look at the changes and shifts in family life in China in the early 20th century. Maoist China’s family policy had already done away with certain feudal …
  • Battle of Legnica (legnitz) 1241. From Legend of Saint Hedwig, 1353, Paul Ghetty museum collection
    Cavalry, Caravans and Christians: the Mongols invade Europe
    In the 13th century, the Mongol ruler Genghis Khan (1162-1227) and his armies advanced across Asia and created the largest contiguous land empire in history. They reached eastern Europe in the …
  • National Museum of Cambodia
    Cambodia: Starting from scratch – Part 4 in a series on failed states
    Cambodia is in transition to have the real state. Throughout the late 1960s and 1970s, Cambodia was a failed state, with governments that were unable to control the country’s territory or meet the …
  • The CCTV Tower in Beijing by Rem Koolhaas
    The daring design of the new headquarters of China Central Television, the state media of the People’s Republic, is controversial for both architectural as well as political reasons. The …