Arts & Culture Europe

Arts & Culture -- list of articles in the section Arts & Culture Europe

  • Readings by James Joyce
    Ulysses, passage from Aeolus episode, reading by James Joyce on November 27, 1924 in Paris Finnegans Wake, Anna Livia Plurabelle, read by James Joyce, 1924 Chamber Music I – XX XVI, read by …
  • Saturday Stage: Radio play – So many surprises
    The play was one of the finalists in a competition organised by Radio Netherlands in 1970. It is set in an old people’s home. Three women awaiting their time to come. In surrounding where the …
  • Mirror Images special: Radio play “Erasmus in the underworld” by Paul V. Hale
     This radio play was among the finalists selected for production in the Golden Windmill Radio Drama contest organized by Radio Netherlands together with the Corporation for Public Broadcasting …
  • Nevil Gray interviews Hildegard Kneff
    Under the title ‘Close up May 5th, 1972’ Nevil Gray interviews the German actress, movie star, singer and author Hildegard Knef about her book ‘Der geschenkte Gaul – Bericht aus einem Leben’ (‘The …
  • Pete Myers interviews Victor Borge and Peter Enahoro
    In this edition of the BBC’s programme “PM”, Pete Myers introduces us to world-famous Danish comedian and musician Victor Borge (1909-2000). We also hear from Nigerian writer Peter …
  • Pete Myers interviews Shirley Bassey (1972)
    18-year-old Shirley Bassey caused a sensation as the “Tigress from Cardiff Bay” when she first appeared in a London West End show in 1956. Her rendition of “Burn my Candle” …
  • Pete Myers interviews Juliette Gréco
    (© Wikipedia) In this edition of the BBC’s programme “PM”, Pete Myers introduces us to the great French chanson singer Juliette Gréco. From singing in the streets as a child, she …
  • Pete Myers interviews Ingrid Bergman
    Ingrid Bergman, one of the greatest screen actresses of the 20th century, is our guest in this interview with Pete Myers, in which she looks back on her career but also discusses her remarkable …
  • Pete Myers: The making of the film “Gandhi”
    David Attenborough’s epic film biography of Mahatma Gandhi (1869-1948) presents a sweeping, masterful image of the life of India’s great pioneer of independence and 20th-century …
  • Salman Rushdie’s Novel “Shame”
    In this programme the renowned and controversial writer Salman Rushdie discusses his third novel “Shame”, published in 1983. The story is set in postcolonial Pakistan and explores the …
  • Monument to Jules Verne
    Aural Tapestry – Under the sea with Jules Verne
    David Swatling indulges his childhood fascinating with Jules Verne. We get some biographical information on the writer and reading from his work. We hear from a French Verne fan and a Dutch actor who …
  • Interview with Joseph Heller
    In this edition of our weekly magazine programme “Rembrandt Express”, Pete Myers speaks with Joseph Heller, the the renowned American novelist and famed author of the classic “Catch …
  • Brief Encounters: Pete Myers’ Diaries, Part 3
    As a young rising star in radio at the BBC, Pete Myers interviewed some of the most memorable people in the entertainment world of his time. He decided in 1972 to keep a record of his impressions of …
  • Interview with Paul Theroux
    Paul Theroux is one of the world’s most famous and successful travel writers and an award-winning author of fiction. His description of Britain (“The Kingdom by the Sea”) and of …
  • Mirror Images: Derek Jarman special
    David Swatling presents a portrait of British film maker Derek Jarman. His first film was Sebastian, spoken in Latin. Others include Carravagio, The Last of England, Edward II, and The Garden. He …
  • Images – Pierre Audi, Mozart Project, new director of the Institut Néerlandais
    Pierre Audi about the the coming opera season Mozart project Philips classics  New director Institut Néerlandais: Ed Craanen Share this:Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to …
  • Saturday Stage: Back “in” Holland
    Saturday Stage was a short entertainment series introduced by Jonathan Marks in early 1992. In this programme, four British comedians present a show mildly sending up Holland and the EEC. They had …
  • Mirror Images: cultural boycotts
    This special edition of the programme focusses on a debate in Amsterdam, entitled Hostages of Stupidity. The discussions dealt with the sense or otherwise of culural boycotts. We hear the opinions of …
  • Mirror Images: Indian women writers
    By the mid-1990’s when this programme was made, a number of Indian writers like Vikram Seth and Salman Rushdie had made a huge impact on the international literary scene. In this programme, we …
  • Isabel Allende: an Interview about her book “Paula”
    The Chilean writer Isabel Allende experienced her first breakthrough with “The House of the Spirits” in 1982. Since then she has written many more best-selling acclaimed books, many of …
  • Copenhagen: city of culture
    Copenhagen currently holds the title of Cultural Capital of Europe, and Denmark’s capital is grabbing this opportunity to put on the biggest cultural event in its history. Throughout the year, …
  • Millennium: Waiting for the End, Part 1 of 2
    In western Christian culture, the arrival of a millenium, a one-thousand-year milestone measuring the time since the birth of Jesus Christ, is a date of great psychological significance. This …
  • Millennium: The Threshold, Part 2 of 2
    It’s just a number, you might say– the year two thousand. And yet the start of a new millennium has been the focus of great fears of destruction and extinction, on the one hand, and …
  • Hans Christian Andersen (1805-1875)
    From The Ugly Ducking to The Emperor’s New Clothes, the timeless tales by Hans Christian Andersen are told, read and filmed worldwide. But perhaps Denmark’s most famous author is …
  • The shack from where Radio Euskadi broadcast in Venezuela
    A voice from outside of town – Radio Euskadi, the Voice of the Basque underground
    To mark the 50th anniversary of the establishment of Radio Euskadi, Media Network presents an in-depth investigation into the history surrounding the Basque clandestine radio station, which is now a …
  • Serious Song: Johannes Brahms
    Robert Green and Michele Ernsting remember Johannes Brahms on the centenary of his death in 1897. With music, anecdotes and readings.  Share this:Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new …
  • Maria Callas
    Siren Song – Maria Callas
    Dheera Sujan remembers Maria Callas, 20 years after her death. What was so special about this great icon of the 20th century. With archive material from Callas herself, with Sigrid Koetse who played …
  • Documenta
    In the past summer of summits – the European summit in Amsterdam, the Summit of Eight in Colorado and the Earth Summit in New York – the art world too is now holding its summit of …
  • Siren Song: Frank McCourt & Fergal Keane
    Dheera Sujan’s guests are both Irish, both are writers and both had alcoholic fathers. Frank McCourt, at 66, gained international literary stardom with his Pulitzer Prize winning book …
  • Siren Song: Berlin arts
    Marijke van der Meer takes us on a tour of Berlin’s cultural scene, eight years after the fall of the Wall and a year before Berlin will be the seat of government again. In the 1920’s, …
  • Siren Song – Edinburgh Festival 1
    In 1997, the famous Edinburgh Festival celebrated its 50th anniversary. In a two-part series, Dheera Sujan went along to sample the goodies on the show.  Part one includes interviews with three …
  • Interviews with Hildegard Kneff and Christopher Isherwood
    In this series of highlights from the Radio Netherlands’ archives marking the station’s 50th anniversary, two interviews: one with British-born writer Christopher Isherwood, but we begin …
  • Mirror Images: Joan Sutherland
    In this gem from our archives, arts producer Nevil Gray speaks with fellow Australian Dame Joan Sutherland (1926-2010), one of the great opera sopranos of the 20th century. In 1982 Nevil caught up …
  • “He Who Does Not Howl with the Wolf”: Composer Richard Wagner’s great-grandson speaks out
    In 1997 a book appeared in German that provided more troubling insights into the dark reputation of the Nazi cult around the composer Richard Wagner. But this time the criticism came from the …
  • Aural Tapestry: Gay Games 1998
    In 1998, Amsterdam hosted the first Gay Games to be held outside of North America. The Games are open to gay and lesbian participants of all ages and are meant to bring LBGT people together from all …
  • Aural Tapestry: Andrew Miller’s 18th century novels
    David Swatling meets British award-winning novelist Andrew Miller whose 18th century novels, “Ingenious Pain” and “Casanova”, have had remarkable critical acclaim. Who is he, …
  • Aural Tapestry: One-man showmanship
      David Swatling meets American solo-performer Frank Sheppard, who amng other things, did (in Holland) a one-man Othello juxtaposing Shakespeare’s tragic Moor with OJ Simpson. David also …
  • Aural Tapestry- Weimar, spiritual capital of Germany
    In 1999, Weimar was the EU’s Cultural Capital of Europe. Just about every German cultural giant lived and worked in the city: from Goethe and Schiller to Bach, Beethoven, Nietzsche and …
  • The Castrati
    In the 18th century, it wasn’t the soprano or the tenor who ruled the operatic stage. It was the castrato. The likes of Farinelli and Pacchierotti were huge stars. Handel, Scarlotti, and Gluck …
  • Mary Cassatt
    In the late 19th century, Mary Cassatt was the only American artist invited into the Impressionist circle in Paris. She was a close friend of Degas, who said of her work: “I am not willing to admit a …
  • Scopitone
    Aural Tapestry – Scopitone and Yol
    Scopitone was a cultural phenomenon of the sixties in France and the United States. It combined a jukebox and a film projector, a kind of forerunner of the music video-clip. David Swatling talked to …
  • Johann Wolfgang von Goethe
    Johann Wolfgang von Goethe (1749-1832) was the greatest writer of his time and even Napoleon insisted on meeting him when the French conqueror happened to be passing through Germany with the Grande …
  • Goethe’s Faust
    The play “Faust” by Johann Wolfgang von Goethe created a sensation when the first part of this drama was published in 1808 and is now considered a milestone of world literature. It is the …
  • Saratoga: the Wickedest City in America
    During the 19th century, a small town in upstate New York quickly grew into America’s most popular resort. With its natural mineral water spas, luxury hotels, horse racing, and gambling casinos, …
  • Dog Day Afternoons: our Canine Muse
    A literary journey with man’s best friend – from the faithful hound Argus in Homer’s The Odyssey to the Russian space dog, Laika. It was Shakespeare’s Hamlet who said, “every dog will have his day.” …
  • Dutch Horizons – Opus One
    Bertine Krol’s very first Dutch Horizons features three items: Bertine interviews in his workshop Dutch master violin builder Jaap Bolink. Includes string music especially composed for an …
  • Rembrandt’s Mirror: The Later Self-Portraits, Part 2 of 2
    In 1999 the famous Mauritshuis Museum in The Hague hosted one of its most spectacular exhibitions: The Self-Portraits of one of the greatest painters of all times, Rembrandt van Rijn (1606-1669). Few …
  • To Be or Not to Be: Suicide and Writers, 2 Parts
    Part 1: From Antiquity to the 19th Century In spite of the great riches they have left behind and the immortality that many of them have achieved through their works, writers have long had a thing …
  • James Joyce in Trieste
    The great Irish writer James Joyce (1882-1941) left Ireland with his wife Nora Barnacle in 1904 and spent the following years in Trieste. This Adriatic port city is now in Italy but was part of the …
  • Celluloid Myths: Monsters, Part 1 of 4
    Cyclops and dragons, vampires, and mummies – monsters have been there since the days of the first storytellers. There are the monsters of nature, the monsters who are man made, the visible …
  • Celluloid Myths: The Virtuous Woman, Part 2 of 4
    The Virgin Mary set an impossible standard for women brought up under the influence of western mythology. She incorporated two mutually incompatible states of being – a Virgin AND a Mother. And …
  • Celluloid Myths: the Femme Fatale, Part 3 of 4
    Eve started it all and women have never been able to live it down since. Seductress, tempter, destroyer of men’s lives. There were the Sirens who lured sailors to jump overboard by the beauty of …
  • Celluloid Myths: Heroes, Part 4 of 4
    The heroic exploits of Odysseus and Lancelot entertained generations of people hungry for heroes. They are what we secretly long to be. We create heroes so we can have someone to reflect our own …
  • 30 Years of Poetry International
    Radio Netherlands recorded the programming of Rotterdam’s Poetry International Festival from its beginning in 1970. A wide variety of international poets are heard reading their own work, including …
  • Dutch tulips
    Aural Tapestry – Tulipomania Dotcom 1
    In this two-part series, David Swatling compares the tulip mania of the 17th century with the latest new economy hype. Part One: The Hype Share this:Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new …
  • Girolamo Savonarola
    Aural Tapestry – Girolamo Savonarola: Renaissance Ayatollah
    In the second part of his Florentine Trilogy, David Swatling focusses on Girolamo Savonarola (1452-1498), a Dominican friar who arrived in Florence in the late 15th century. His sermons were said to …
  • Lorenzo de Medici
    Aural Tapestry – Lorenzo the Magnificent: Patron and Poet
    David Swatling profiles the incredible life of Lorenzo de Medici (1449-1492), member of the most prominent Florentine family. Apart from being a poet, musician, philosopher and diplomat, he was also …
  • Aural Tapestry – Nicolo Machiavelli: Cynical Politico
    “Machiavellian” has come to mean: elaborate, cunning, scheming, unscrupulous. David Swatling examines the life of Niccolo Machiavelli, the Florentine statesman and political writer who …
  • Decameron_DayVstory1_-_Vatican_Lib_-_PalLat1989_f150
    Aural Tapestry: Boccaccio – 14th centruy post-modern
    David Swatling and his scholar-guests analyse and explain the many layers in Baccaccio’s The Decameron, a book that inspired later writers like Chaucer, Shakespeare and Keates. His main …
  • The Concert by Johannes Vermeer
    Aural Tapestry – Stolen art and antiquities
    The stealing of art and artifacts is said to be as old as man itself. To find out how prevalent it is today (and historically), David Swatling spoke to the editor of Minerva, the International Review …
  • Memorial to the writer Agatha Christie erected in 2012 at the eastern end of Cranbourn Street at the corner of St Martin's Lane.
    Aural Tapestry – Queens of Crime
    David Swatling meets three crime writers of the post-Agatha Christie era who have made their mark on crime fiction. However, the ladies – P.D. James, Ruth Rendell and Mary Wings – …
  • Jan Steen - Beware of Luxury
    Aural Tapestry – Sex and the Masters
    In this programme, David Swatling turns his attention to sex and the masters. While tame to modern eyes, many paintings from the 17th century were full of sexual symbolism. Some paintings of …
  • Aural Tapestry – Early music festival Utrecht
    In this documentary, David Swatling visits the Holland Festival of Early Music in Utrecht and talks to the organisers about why this type of music is becoming increasingly popular. Lots of …
  • Purely Flamenco
    Jane Murphy visits the Flamenco Festival in Jérez in the flamenco heart of Andalucía, pure heaven for lovers of the dance. She meets some of its stars, including Paco Peña and Angeli de Gomez. In the …
  • Walt Whitman: Father of Modern Poetry, Part 2 of 2- The Good Gray Poet
    In 1855 a “poetic divo” burst onto the literary stage and changed the course of poetic expression. Walt Whitman’s “Leaves of Grass” is considered the beginning of modern poetry. Part Two explores the …
  • Chris Chambers meets Eva Besnyö
    In this uncut interview (for Talking it Over), Chris Chambers talks to Hungarian-born photographer Eva Besnyö who started taking pictures in 1928. In the 1930s, she fled to the Netherlands. She went …
  • Aural Tapestry: Addicted to Greek music
    David Swatling visits Dutch correspondent Frans van Hasselt (75) who has lived and worked most of his life in Athens. During that period, he developed a great love of Greek music. During a stroll in …
  • Sound Fountain: Silencing words
    Almost since the first words were written down, attempts were made to censor them. But those who try to suppress the word (for religious, political or other reasons) by punishing writers have found …
  • Aural Tapestry: The margins of history
      David Swatling meets author Barry Unsworth, one of the great contemporary masters of historical fiction. He’s written about Medieval traveling players, 18th century slave traders and the …
  • Aural Tapestry: A Song for Brother Francesco
    David Swatling tells the fascinating life story of Saint Frances of Assisi, with the help of Valerie Martin, author of the book “Salvation: Scenes from the Life of St. Frances”, and …
  • If wishes were horses
    The relationship between humans and horses can be traced back as far as the cave drawings of early man. And ever since, artists and writers have tried to capture the beauty and grace of these …
  • The role of culture
    Hélène Michaud takes a look at what role culture takes in various stages of a country’s development. In Bosnia, the Sarajevo film festival helped create a feeling of solidarity in the besieged …
  • Saints Alive
    For well over a thousand years the saints have been held up as examples for Catholics around the world. Though the church sets the standards for sainthood, the choice of saints is often dependent on …
  • Interview with Salman Rushdie, author of the Dutch book week gift 2001
    Indian-born author Salman Rushdie was invited to write the Netherlands’ book-week gift in 2001. The theme was writers between two cultures. The book Rushdie wrote was called …
  • Dance theatre
    The Human Body in Art – The Body Corporal
    Of all the images that artists have had at hand, none have had as much representation as the human body, which has been a source of boundless fascination through the ages. To the artists who tried to …
  • Two Tales of the City: Water and Land in Amsterdam, Part 2 of 2- The Windmiller’s Tale
    In this new millenium, Amsterdam like so many cities around the world has been facing the challenge of building for an expanding population, a changing economy, and new technologies. In these two …
  • Sound Fountain: von Trapped
    In the programme, a woman talks about her obesssion with The Sound of Music and what she’s tried to do about it. It’s produced by the Australian Broadcasting Corporation and was part of …
  • Remembering Marlene (Dietrich)
      To mark the 100th birthday of one of the great sex godesses of the 20th century, David Swatling presents an impression of the lady, as seen through the eyes of some of her fans. It includes an …
  • Scarecrows: a Personal Essay
      In this edition of “Aural Tapestry”, David Swatling weaves together the many threads of stories, legends and personal memories relating to the humble scarecrow. Starting with his …
  • The Real Kamasutra
    The world’s most famous text on erotic love, The Kamasutra, is a collection of Sanskrit writings put together in India in the 3rd century. The text has been used and abused, misinterpreted and …
  • Goddess of the Netherlands: Belle van Zuylen
    Isabelle Agneta Elisabeth van Tuyll van Serooskerken (1740-1805) was her full name at birth, an impressive enough name on its own. She came to be known as simply Belle van Zuylen, the future Isabelle …
  • Among the Ruins: From Acropolis to Metropolis
    When this programme was made at the start of the century, Athens was undergoing a radical face-lift in feverish preparation for Greece’s hosting of the 2004 Olympics. What started out as a …
  • Old trades, new hands – Building a castle in Burgundy
    Hélène Michaud visits Guédelon in France where a medieval castle is being built with the same tools, techniques, etc., as 800 years ago. The workers are volunteers or people without jobs. The point …
  • Donald Mitchell meets Valery Gergiev
    Donald Mitchell talks to Russian conductor Valery Gergiev after a performance of Mahler’s 6th symphony with the Rotterdam Philharmonic in September 2002. The live interview took place before a …
  • Enid Blyton: 20th Century Mother Goose
      Books can be a comfort, an escape from the demands and unpleasant realities of life. In this programme, the Sound Fountain looks at the very different public and private life of Enid Blyton, …
  • The Janus Gift: Manic Depression and Creativity
    A person with bipolar disorder, or manic depression, typically can experience mood swings between extreme happiness and the deepest hell. This thoroughly treatable condition is the subject of a …
  • Love Story: In Love with the Romance Novel
    Dheera Sujan reveals the secret she’s kept for half a lifetime – her teenage addiction to romance novels. She talks to the people who create the handsomer than life heroes, and write the books one …
  • Tagore: the Wisdom Master
    In 1913, the Nobel Prize for literature was awarded to Indian poet Rabindranath Tagore (1861-1941). It was the first time the prize was given to an Asian writer. But Tagore was more than a poet. He …
  • Journey to the Well: a Visit with Poet Cathal Ó Searcaigh
    Irish poet Cathal Ó Searcaigh lives in the north of County Donegal on land his family has farmed for generations. Tucked in a beautiful glen under the shadow of Mount Errigal, his house is decked …
  • Jacques Brel
    Aural Tapestry – Jacques Brel
    In this programme, David Swatling portrays Jacques Brel, who’s been called a historian of the human heart. The programme visits an exhibition on Brel and talks to contemporary singers or his …
  • Leonardo’s Magnificent Failure and the Mona Lisa
    This programme was produced in 2003 to mark the 500th anniversary of what many consider to be the most famous painting in the world. The mysterious smile of Leonardo da Vinci’s “Mona Lisa” has …
  • Let Them Eat Cake
    On July 14th France celebrated Bastille Day, commemorating the beginning of the French Revolution and the ideas of equality and liberty for all. Popular history credits the start of the uprising as a …
  • Poetry in a Small Language: Minority Languages at Poetry International
    Rotterdam’s Poetry International Festival 2003 had a special program to highlight minority languages, such as Welsh, Mayan, Corsican, and Livonian. This program features interviews with the Welsh and …
  • Pascal Khoo Thwe: The Land of Green Ghosts
    Destiny brought together two men from different worlds – one a Padaung tribal from the hill tracts of Burma, the other an ivory tower Cambridge don. The meeting would change both their lives forever. …
  • Berlin in 1926, the Haller Revue Ensemble at the Admiralspalast Theater, Foto BPK from Berliner Zeitung
    Berlin Cabaret: the film and historical reality
    This documentary from 2003 was made to celebrate the 30th anniversary of the release of the film Cabaret and looks at whether the portrayal of Berlin cabaret was anything like the reality of the …
  • Imagining Farm Machinery
    American author Dale Peck’s fictional memoir “What We Lost” intersected with producer David Swatling’s own family history in striking ways. Two upstate New York farms in the late 1950s are separated …
  • Walking the Black Dog: Depression
    In the early 17th century, Robert Burton’s exhaustive study “The Anatomy of Melancholy” was an immediate best-seller. Nearly four hundred years later, Andrew Solomon included Burton in his own …
  • The Music House
    In the rainforests of central Africa, the Baka pygmies have one of the oldest and most sensitive musical cultures on Earth. They sing to draw animals prior to a hunt, to wake the forest spirits to …
  • The Volga Boatmen: the Wanderings of an Icon
    The program traces the story of the Volga Boatmen in art, starting with Ilya Repin’s painting of the Barge-Haulers in the Russian Museum in Saint-Petersburg, and an interview with art historian David …
  • The Intriguing Theremin
    People fainted when the Theremin was first performed onstage in Paris in 1928. Its haunting sound resembled voices from beyond the grave. It was the first electronic instrument – and at that time, …
  • The Story of the Carmina Burana
    It has been used to advertise coffee and perfume, to rouse the spirit at football games, and even been hijacked for house music and rap. The Carmina Burana does indeed seem indestructible. But who …
  • Beethoven’s 9th: A Beginner’s Guide to the Ode to Joy
    It was a favourite of the Nazi Party; it was adopted by Communists to celebrate Marx’s ideals; it was played at the fall of the Berlin Wall to celebrate the collapse of Communism; and it’s currently …
  • Games Afoot: the world of board games
    Why do people play board games? Who invents them? What makes a game so good it is played for thousands of years, while others flop? In this programme, we meet Paul Clark, who has just launched his …
  • James Meek: “The People’s Act of Love”
    Acclaimed by Newsweek magazine as one of the top ten best works of fiction of the first decade of this century, “The People’s Act of Love” is a novel by British writer and …
  • Will the Real Will Shakespeare Please Stand Up?
    The question surrounding the authorship of plays and sonnets by William Shakespeare has been debated for centuries. Two books take very different points of view on the issue. Amsterdam-based author, …
  • Becoming Rebecca West
    A portrait of British journalist/writer Rebecca West (1892-1983) whose life spanned most of the 20th century, with memories from her great-niece and thoughts from an actress who portrays her on …
  • Flamenco
    Aural Tapestry – Paco Peña’s Passion
    David Swatling meets Paco Peña, the master of flamenco and composer of flamenco of the Misa Flamenca. The interview covers the origin of flamenco and the idea behind his flamenco mass and features …
  • Sheep and insomnia
    Aural Tapestry – Counting sheep, notes from an insomniac
    David Swatling focuses on insomnia and how it has appeared in literature, with readings from Shakespeare, Dickens, Emily Bronte, Kafka, Sylvia Plath, among others. Producer: David Swatling Share …
  • Imagination is the Instrument of Compassion
    New York author Jonathan Safran Foer’s novel “Extremely Loud & Incredibly Close” is part of a wave of what has been dubbed “post-9/11 fiction.” But some critics say not enough time has passed to …
  • Two Vincents: The bond between Vincent van Gogh and Vincent Polakovic
    Was it fate or chance that brought them together? Theirs is probably one of the most unbelievable yet most fruitful encounters one could imagine. Vincent Polakovic, a lawyer from Slovakia, had always …
  • Verbal Fireworks: Slam Poet Alix Olson
    Spoken word artist Alix Olson calls her voice her “weapon of choice” and her powerful work contains equal doses of humor, anger, and compassion. A champion slam poet, Olson introduced the urban …
  • British psychic Gordon Smith, 2010
    Gordon’s Gift: the British psychic Gordon Smith
    Gordon Smith has a remarkable gift. Since he was a child, he has claimed to be able to speak to the dead. He’s now acclaimed as one of the greatest clairvoyants of his generation, whilst still …
  • Indian Courtesans and the Baiji Tradition
    From the 16th century onwards, the guardians of the great vocal music of northern India were the “courtesans”, the Tawaif Baiji, high-class women schooled in dancing, song and poetry who …
  • Dutch Cossack
    When Cossack culture was it rehabilitated after the collapse of the Soviet Union, the once suppressed Cossack music was revived, having been silenced for decades in Russia. A young Dutch conductor …
  • For Every Atom Belonging to Me: Novelist Michael Cunningham
    Pulitzer Prize author Michael Cunningham invokes the spirit of Walt Whitman in his collection of novellas “Specimen Days.” It is considered part of a wave of post-9/11 fiction. Cunningham talks about …
  • Mozart as a child, 1763 (coll. Mozarteum, Salzburg)
    A Dutch Divertimento: Mozart visits the Netherlands
    Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (1756-1791), one of the greatest musical talents of all times, was only a child when he first acquired fame throughout Europe for his virtuosity at the piano and his …
  • Song of a Troubled Heart: Mahler and Freud meet
    In 1910, two of the greatest minds in European culture decide to meet, not in their native Vienna, but at the train station of Leiden in the Netherlands: Sigmund Freud, the father of psychoanalysis, …
  • A Bohemian in Amsterdam
    A  Bohemian in Amsterdam looks at the life and work of Jan Amos Comenius. Hélène Michaud examines the last 14 years of this Czech humanist’s life which was spent in exile in Amsterdam, and …
  • Radio Books: Contemporary Dutch and Flemish Short Stories – Lieve Joris
    Lieve Joris: “Bollieke” Lieve Joris is an internationally acclaimed, award-winning travel writer from Belgium. Her writing focuses chiefly on Africa, the Middle East and eastern Europe, …
  • Radio Books: Contemporary Dutch and Flemish Short Stories – Ivo Michiels
    Ivo Michiels: “Amandine, or the thousand letters of love” Every now and then, she has to open doors for colleagues of the Red Cross aid agency, but she also writes love letters to …